Alice Englert Talks ‘BEAUTIFUL CREATURES’

Alice Englert has a strong head on her shoulders, as well as an experienced head, at least when it comes to the “business.”  Being the daughter of parents in the business, including one with an Academy Award, does that to you.

If you haven’t seen ‘Beautiful Creatures’ in the theaters yet, you should check it out.  You’ll find for yourself that even though she’s new to being in front of the camera, she is amazing in her role as Lena Duchannes.

Here’s another interview in which she talks about the movie:

Alice Englert with director Richard LaGravense

Alice Englert with director Richard LaGravense

Question:  Is it true that you didn’t want to do this film and that it took director Richard LaGravenese to convince you otherwise?

ALICE ENGLERT:  Yeah.  He didn’t want to make the film that we had been pitched, so the fact that we didn’t want to do the film that we had been pitched meant that we all wanted to do the same thing when we came together.  Richard brought together a team of people who didn’t want to just make some generic rip-off.  What I love about the movie and the script that Richard wrote is that, while it sits in a mainstream genre, it just leans a little left of center, in my opinion.  It enjoys and plays with every cliché, but isn’t owned by cliché.

Since he was cast so late, was it difficult to have Alden Ehrenreich show up so last-minute?

ENGLERT:  You didn’t feel it.  He was #1 on the callsheet, which could have been terrible.  We needed something that we could support, and he was that.  It was so bizarre.  He worked so hard.  He’s got such a great work ethic.  It’s really annoying and frustrating.

Alice Englert as Lena Duchannes and Emmy Rossum as Ridley Duchannes

Alice Englert as Lena Duchannes and Emmy Rossum as Ridley Duchannes

What was it like to work with this amazing cast?

ENGLERT:  Viola Davis was the first person cast in this film, and I think I was the second or third.  That, alone, said something to me.  I really love her.  She’s someone who I love because she shows you how you can really just relax and be honest.  Honesty is fantastic.  Viola showed me how to not need to perform for people and know how to take your own time.  Some of us don’t have the energy to be as incredible and riotous and fantastic as Emma Thompson.  You’re constantly just lapping up her incredible hilariousness.  And I’ve had a crush on Jeremy Irons since I was a child.  I love him!

What surprised you most about how inventive this story is, in telling something familiar, but in a way that hasn’t been seen before?

ENGLERT:  That was what really sold me on the script.  What we were able to do was have a film that could just fall left of center of every cliché that we dealt with, or laugh at them, or just completely embody them and love them.  That was great!  We couldn’t have done this film without having a sense of humor.  And we had such a great cast and crew for that.

beautiful-creatures-englertWhat do you think you could accomplish, if you were a Caster, in real life?

ENGLERT:  I don’t think I would accomplish anything, if I had Lena’s powers.  That was difficult, especially being a young person.  Feeling the responsibility of all the women going, “It’s raining again?  My hair!”  I think that’s a lot of responsibility.  I don’t know how I would handle it.

Were you able to wrap your head around the whole Civil War reenactment obsession aspect of this film?

ENGLERT:  I don’t really know how to comment about that. The Civil War reenactors in the film were Civil War reenactors, and they would camp out on Honey Hill while we were shooting.  It’s intense, but it is interesting.

Are you worried about the comparisons to Twilight, at all?

ENGLERT:  No, I’m not worried.  It was pitched to us as Romeo & Juliet meets Twilight, but then I read the script.  I think “the new Twilight” really is a media phrase.  Even The Hunger Games, which isn’t a Twilight story and has nothing to do with Twilight was called “the nextTwilight.”

Alice Englert BEAUTIFUL CREATURES Interview | Collider.

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